Shark Diving in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa

Spotted Ragged Tooth Sharks l Great White Shark l Whale Sharks l
Zambezi / Bull Sharks
l Tiger Sharks

Shark shark south africa raggie shark diving

Photo's by Paul de Meillon ©

Shark diving with Bull sharks (Zambezis), Spotted Ragged tooth shark, Tiger sharks, Whale sharks, Copper sharks and the occasional Great White, all found in the warm Indian Ocean. Combine your shark dive with wildlife safaris, zulu cultural and scenic tours.

KwaZulu Natal offers shark diving with no cages in the warm waters of the Indian Ocean on the East coast of South Africa and Mozambique. Sharks that can be seen are Bull Shark (known as Zambezis in South Africa) - Dusky - Spinner - three types of Hammerhead - Copper shark - Spotted Ragged Toothed shark, Tiger shark, and the protected Great White as an occasional sighting. Whale sharks can be seen sporadically, throughout the year, and are particularly satisfying to spot.

South African shark diving poses little threat to scuba divers whilst making shark diving an exciting experience, so put your mind at rest, your gear on, and discover the best diving to be found around.

Spotted Ragged Tooth Sharks l Great White Shark l Whale Sharks l
Zambezi / Bull Sharks
l Tiger Sharks

The Whale shark
An enormous creature, growing up to 18 meters (60-odd feet) and more. It is a dark colour with pale spots which cover the entire body. It has a massive mouth, in which to gather food as it swims, rather than actively catch it's prey. It's diet consists mainly of small bait fish and plankton which are sucked into the huge mouth, although the occasional larger fish are not refused. It is very toothy, with up to 300 rows of teeth, each containing 100's of tiny teeth. According to one story, a diver was once sucked into a whale sharks mouth, but was quickly spat out again, and he lived to tell the tale. The whale shark has never been known to attack humans, and when frightened, it will rather make a quick getaway, or sink lower in the water. The mother breeds eggs, which are kept inside her, and hatch to give birth to live young of approximately 15 inches long. It is found in various places in the Indian ocean off the coast of Southern Africa, and sightings are relatively frequent at Sodwana and Aliwal Shoal, and is a must on any wish-list of experiences.

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The Bull Shark (Zambezi Shark)

A dangerous species, which are considered to be more dangerous than the Great White Shark. The body is heavy, with a short, stout nose. The jaws are extremely powerful, with wide, serrated triangular shaped upper teeth. They average in size between 3m - 3.5m, although larger specimens are not uncommon. They tend to prefer murky waters, such as rivers and river mouths, and most breeding is done in river mouths. They can live in almost any waters, from a low saline content, such as rivers, to the high saline levels found in the ocean. Although they can be found in the oceans, they are far more common in shallow waters close to land. Attacks are very rare, however, they can display very aggressive behaviour. A mock charge is common, with the shark beginning to widely circle it's target. The circling narrows with each pass, until finally, the zambezi heads straight for the victim, veering off at the last minute - Possibly stemming from a skewy sense of humour. They can be commonly found on the South Coast, and are plentiful in Lake St Lucia.

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The Spotted Ragged Tooth Shark

Commonly found at Protea Banks and Aliwal Shoal, and although harmless, they make for an exciting dive. Their large, imposing appearance with their ferocious looking teeth, is an impressive sight. The teeth look like they could use the services of a very good orthodontist, being curved and facing in different directions. Their teeth, however terrifying they may appear to be, are very unsuited to biting humans and large fish. They use Aliwal shoal as a mating ground from July to November, and can be seen in the various caves, and Shark Alley, whilst enjoying their siesta. They are a common sighting along the South African East Coast.

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Tiger Sharks

Considered to be a dangerous species. They grow to a very large size of 6m and more, and have strong serrated upper teeth, which are hooked. They can swim in very shallow water, and often come close to shore at night, and keep to the deeps in the daytime, although there are often exceptions to the rule. Younger sharks have very distinctive stripes, which grow more indistinct as the shark gets older and larger, sometimes no longer visible. They are not fussy about their diet, and many strange items, such as clothes, wood, and metal can be found in their stomachs. One should be wary of these magnificent creatures, and be aware of the potential danger.

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Great White Shark

Doesn't the name alone strike a cord of terror? This poor creature has had rotten press. Yes it is dangerous, and is known to be the perfect predator, but we just don't taste good to him. The attacks that have been recorded are usually 'hit and runs', or a case of mistaken identity by juveniles, or how else would there be so many survivors of this type of shark attack. Surfers and bodyboarders are at the most risk.Their sense of smell is very acute, and they can smell 1 part of blood in over a million parts of water.

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